Gazpacho w/ Seared Scallops

The summer heat is upon us and this gazpacho with seared scallops is so good! Flavored packed recipe that is perfect to cool down with. gazpacho recipe with scallops

If you never have tried gazpacho before now is the time! Some people are put off by a "cold soup" but it is light and refreshing. Originating from Andalusia, Spain, gazpacho is a mostly vegetable base. There are some versions that will even incorporate fruit such as grapes and strawberries.

gazpacho recipe with scallops

As always, I love texture and decided to make a light and refreshing tomato salad to spoon on top--and the showstopper sear scallops! If you are looking for a delicious and opening star for your next dinner, this recipe is a must make!

gazpacho recipe with scallops

Gazpacho w/ Seared Scallops

  • 2 large tomatoes, cored and roughly chopped (you can use red tomatoes or heirlooms.)
  • 1 stalk of celery, rough chopped
  • 1/2 mediume cucumber, peeled, seeded and rough chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 1/2 piece of bread, torn into pieces (optional if you want to keep it gluten free)
  • 1/2 cup parsley, loosely packed
  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • a pinch of fresh cracked black pepper

Tomato Relish

  • 1 cup tomatoes, chopped in to 1/2 inch
  • 1/2 cup cucumber peeled and seeded, diced
  • 1 tablespoon fresno chile, diced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • a splash sherry vinegar
  • kosher salt to season
  • fresh cracked black pepper
  • 1 avocado diced

Seared Scallops

  • 6 medium sized scallops
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil

Gazpacho

  1. In a blender combine the tomatoes, celery, cucumber, garlic, bread, parsley, sherry vinegar, olive oil, salt and black pepper. Blend on high speed until smooth. If your blender cannot hold all of the ingredients, blend in batches. Taste and adjust seasonings. Serve with the tomato relish, seared scallops and a drizzle of more olive oil. 

Tomato Relish

  1. Combine the tomatoes, cucumber, fresno, olive oil, sherry vinegar, salt and pepper. Toss and let sit for 10 minutes to marinate. When ready for serve, toss in avocado and spoon on top of gazpacho. 

Seared Scallops

  1. Make sure to pull the muscle that is attached to scallops on the side (it will be tough) Place scallops on paper towels and "dry out" in the refrigerator for 20 minutes. Your goal is to make sure a good bit of the moisture if gone--which equals a great sear. 

  2. Take scallops from out of the refrigerator and pat dry again and sprinkle with some kosher salt. Preheat a heavy bottom cast iron skillet with grapeseed oil over medium-high heat (to where it is starting to smoke). Gently add scallops  making sure to not overcrowd the pan and cook undisturbed for 2-3 minutes. You should start to see a golden ring form (the crust). Take a spatula and flip one scallop to see if it is to your liking. Once the golden crust forms, flip all scallops and cook for 1 minute on the other side and serve. (You want to briefly cook it on the other side).

 

New Orleans Yakamein Soup

new orleans old sober yakamein-www.beyondthebayoublog.com Yakamein or "Old Sober" is a soup I had growing up. Reminiscent of pho, it is a simple no-fuss soup. Often using beef chuck roast and simmered slowly until tender with aromatics of garlic and onions.

Dashes of soy sauce.

Some beef bouillon for added beefy flavor.

And served with spaghetti, ketchup (yes ketchup), a hard boiled egg and a heavy sprinkle of green onions.

new orleans old sober yakamein-www.beyondthebayoublog.com-12

new orleans old sober yakamein-www.beyondthebayoublog.com

The history of Yakamein is not truly understood. Some say it was brought back by the soldiers from the Korean War. And others state that it was introduced to New Orleans from the Chinese immigrants. Whatever the case, I'm glad it came to be.

For my Yakamein, I wanted to make my own spaghetti--since I have been neglecting my pasta maker, but your favorite store brought spaghetti will do. I added ginger to my broth, picked up a chuck roast and decided to add some beef back bones.

There are also some recipes that use pork or both beef and pork. Some would also throw in shrimp. I hope y'all try this delicious yet simple soup that I had growing up and enjoy it just as much as I did and still do!

new orleans old sober yakamein-www.beyondthebayoublog.comnew orleans old sober yakamein-www.beyondthebayoublog.comnew orleans old sober yakamein-www.beyondthebayoublog.com

New Orleans Yakamein Soup

  • 3 lbs beef chuck roast
  • 2-3 beef back bones (optional)
  • 2 teaspoons of Creole seasoning
  • 1 inch piece of ginger
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce or tamari
  • 1 tablespoon beef bouillon (I like the better than bouillon brand)
  • dried chile peppers
  • 1 package of spaghetti, cooked
  • thinly sliced onions
  • green onions for garnish
  • 5 hard boiled eggs
  • ketchup for garnish
  • Sambal Oelek Chili paste
  1. Place the chuck roast and beef ribs in a large stock pot or slow cooker and cover with water. Add creole seasoning, dried peppers and over medium-high heat, bring to a simmer, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 3 to 4 hours, until the beef is tender.

  2. Remove beef and cube the chuck roast, place aside. Season broth with ginger, soy sauce, beef bouillon. Simmer for 5-10 minutes add beef back in and taste and adjust to your liking. 

  3. In a bowl add the spaghetti with some beef and broth. Garnish with onions, green onions, boil egg and ketchup or Sambal. Enjoy!

If your Creole seasoning contains salt, be sure to cut back the salt in either the soy sauce or beef bouillon. 

Tortellini With Collard Green Brodo

tortellini with collard green brodo-www.beyondthebayoublog.com Tortellini neslted  in a collard green bacon-y brodo broth--need I say more?

For the past few months I've been wanting to really get better at pasta making. Yes, there are great fresh and dried pastas on the market, but nothing compares to actually doing it yourself. I made fresh pasta for this recipe, but store brought tortellini would work perfectly!

The inspiration from this recipe came from Chef Michael Hudman. He made a black-eyed pea tortellini with a ham hock brodo. Initially, I tried to make a collard green pasta but it was a fail, like epic!

Too much moisture.

I do plan on attempting it again, so stay tuned. I had some delicious Benton's Country Ham and brought a small piece of pork loin that ended up becoming my filling/farce. I ground up the meat finely, added some white pepper, parmesan cheese, a pinch of freshly grated nutmeg and salt. That was it!

tortellini with collard green brodo-www.beyondthebayoublog.com

As for the brodo, go to your local grocery store and see if they have parmesan rinds for sale. I've noticed that they have been popping up and are great to add into meat sauces. Check out my pork ragu recipe!

Water, cleaned and chopped collard greens, sliced bacon, parmesan rinds, salt and pepper and a splash of apple cider vinegar. Let everything simmer for 30 minutes to an hour and scoop out the rinds and then serve.

This was really fun to make and cannot wait to test out other fillings and pasta recipes.

This recipe will work great with fresh tortellini already made. Just add the tortellini to the brodo. You can choose to have a cheese or meat filling.

Don't forget to check out my first pasta recipe, Roasted Tomato Sauce With Andouille & Picci 

tortellini with collard green brodo-www.beyondthebayoublog.com

 

Tortellini & Collard Green Brodo

Collard Green Brodo

  • 5 pieces of bacon, cut up
  • 1 cup onions, sliced
  • a pinch red pepper flakes
  • 4 cups of collard greens roughly chopped
  • 4 parmesan rinds
  • 5 cups chicken broth
  • kosher salt to taste
  • 3-4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 package of fresh or frozen tortellini
  1. Fill a pot with salted water and cook tortellini to package instruction. Drain and rinse with cold water until ready to be added to broth. 

  2. In a pot over medium heat, cook the bacon until most of the fat has rendered. Add the onions, red pepper flakes and collard greens. Cook for 4-5 minutes. Add parmesan rinds and broth. Simmer for 30-45 minutes. Add kosher salt and apple cider vinegar. Adjust seasonings if need be.

  3. Add cooked tortellini to the broth and cook until heated through. Serve with grated parmesan and enjoy!

Creamy Chicken Soup With Rice

Creamy Chicken soup recipe-www.beyondthebayou.com This creamy chicken soup with rice is not your average soup. I was craving something homely and satisfying for a cool front that came through Dallas and decided on something with chicken. I did not want the usual chicken soup, so I opted for a creamy version with one distinct ingredient--preserved lemon. Preserved lemon is a "lemon pickle" used in many Moroccan and Middle Eastern dishes. It adds a great zip of lemony acidity that helps balance out the soup.

This creamy chicken soup with rice it pretty straight-forward and quick. What made it even quicker was the shortcut of buying a rotisserie chicken from the store. For the base, I made a roux--equal parts flour and butter, and then added my veggies, preserved lemon, milk, stock, and rice. I used wild rice, but any rice can be used. Swiss chard was added after the rice cooked and then in went the chicken.

Creamy Chicken soup recipe-www.beyondthebayou.com

Creamy Chicken Soup With Wild Rice

  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 4 tablespoons flour
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 stalk celery, diced
  • 1 carrot diced
  • 1 cup yellow onions, diced
  • 1 cup mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 teaspoons preserved lemon, diced finely
  • 1 cup milk
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 teaspoon chicken bouillon paste
  • 1/2 cup wild rice
  • 1 teaspoon worchestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper, ground
  • 1 rotisserie chicken, pulled
  • 1/2 cup frozen peas
  • 1 bunch swiss chard, chopped (optional)
  1. In a pot over medium heat, melt butter and add flour. Stir with a wooden spoon for a few minutes. Add olive oil,  garlic, celery, carrots, onions, mushrooms and preserved lemon. Saute for 4-5 minutes. 

  2. Add rice, milk, chicken stock, bouillon paste, Worcestershire, granulated garlic and white pepper. Cook for 20-30 minutes until rice is cooked through. 

  3. While rice is cooking, pull meat from rotisserie chicken and place aside. Once rice is cooked, add in pulled chicken, frozen peas, and swiss chard. Adjusts seasoning and serve with some saltine crackers!

New Orleans Gumbo

New Orleans Gumbo Here it is, the final step in making gumbo. Taking all of your hard work and prep and putting it all together to make the final dish. Authentic New Orleans style gumbo.

If you need a refresher, here are the links to the previous post:

Gumbo Roux

Gumbo Fixin's

One thing to remember is to add your seafood and pulled chicken last. We want the seafood perfectly tender to cooked through. And since the chicken is already cooked, we do not want it to be mushy and stringy.

New Orleans Gumbo

As always, have fun! And may this dish become a part of your holiday repertoire as it is with my family. After making gumbo and following the steps, you will see how easy it is and how you wish you would have tackled this classic New Orleans dish sooner.

Stock and Fixin's

This is day 2. Let your stock simmer and gather all your meats.

Seafood Stock

  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 cups yellow or white onion cut in half
  • 2 stalks celery, roughly chopped
  • 1 carrot roughly chopped
  • 1 head garlic, split in half
  • 1 pound shrimp shells
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 lemon halved
  • 1 whole bay leaf

Fixin's

  • 1 1/2 pounds shrimp, peeled and devined
  • 3 blue crabs (cut into 4 pieces)
  • 1 pound andouille sausage, sliced
  • 1 stalk celery diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 onion diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 rotisserie chicken meat pulled
  • 1 cup ham, roughly chopped

Seafood Stock

  1. Heat oil in a large pot over moderate heat. Add onions, celery, carrots, leeks, and garlic. Cook for about 3 minutes. Add the shrimp shells, thyme, black peppercorns, lemon and bay leaf and cover with 4 quarts of water. Reduce heat and let simmer for at least 2 hours. Strain through a fine sieve into a container. Let stock cool , cover, and refrigerate.

Fixin's

  1. Gather all ingredients and individually place them in their separate containers.
  2. All meat can be stored together, except the chicken. Put that in last, we do not want it getting over cooked!

 

New Orleans Gumbo

  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme or leaves from 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 lemon cut in half
  • 1 capful crab boil
  • A few dashes of Louisiana hot sauce
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • basic creole seasoning spices (Season to taste. Start off with 1 teaspoon.)
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce (Season to taste. Start off with 1 teaspoon.)
  • kosher salt to taste (Season to taste. Start off with 1/2 teaspoon)
  1. Add the 3 tablespoons of oil to a heavy bottom cast-iron skillet. Add your celery, green bell peppers, onions, and garlic and stir with a wooden spoon for 5 minutes.
  2. Add prepared roux to skillet. Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue stirring roux and vegetables for about 5 minutes.
  3. Start building your roux by adding your fixin's. Blue crabs, meats (sausage, ham, gizzards). Add 3 quarts of stock to pot, thyme, bay leaves, crab boil, and lemon. (make sure to not get any seeds in the gumbo)

  4. Bring Gumbo to a boil, stiring occasionally. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 45-55 minutes. Stirring occascionaly and skimming any fat from the surface.
  5. Remove lemon and add shrimp, rotisserie chicken, hot sauce, black pepper, creole seasoning, worcestershire sauce, and salt.
  6. Garnish with crab meat and green onions.

 

 

Braised Calamari & Sausage

braised calamari Tender braised calamari? Spicy sausage? This is a recipe that contains a handful of things that I love. Seafood, sausage, and potatoes. All these items are simmered in a rich flavorful tomato broth that is seasoned with fennel, onions, garlic, and white wine. Honestly, how can we go wrong here?

braised calamari and sausage

I am a big fan of braises, especially since the weather has taken a dive under 50. For this recipe, I seared the sausage, wiped out the pan and continued on with my other ingredients. There was some seafood stock stashed in the freezer that I used, but chicken or vegetable stock would work just fine.

braised calamari and sausage

I was afraid the calamari would be tough--yes we have all heard horror stories. But, it was perfect. Add the potatoes in last, we do not want mashed potatoes, but want them to keep their integrity and texture a little bit. As they cook, they soak up the delicious broth and become super tasty. Grab a bottle of wine, a nice baguette and enjoy this yummy dish.

Bon appetite!

Braised Calamari & Sausage

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound spicy sausage (removed from casings and divided into patties)
  • 1 small fennel bulb diced (reserve fonds for garnish)
  • 1/2 cup green bell pepper diced
  • 1/2 cup onions diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3/4 cups white wine
  • 1/2 cup seafood stock
  • 1 1/2 cups tomato pureed or diced
  • 1 pound squid (bodies and tentacles)
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • Dash of Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 large potato diced (reserve in water until ready to use)
  1. Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Add sausage patties and fry on each side for 4 minutes. Remove from skillet and place aside. Whip out any excess fat, leaving behind 1 tablespoon. Add fennel, bell pepper, onions, garlic and red pepper flakes. Season with salt and pepper. Saute for 4 minutes.
  2. Add white wine, seafood stock, tomato, smoked paprika and worcestershire. Simmer for 3 minutes.
  3. Return sausage to skillet and add squid. Cover skillet with a lid and braised for 20 minutes.
  4. After 20 mintues, add potatoes, cover, and cook for an aditonal 15 mintues.
  5. Cook until squid is tender. Taste for seasoning and add lemon juice at end. Sereve with crusty bread and fennel fonds.

The Makings of Gumbo: The Fixin's

Day 2: Gather the fixin's.

Day one is out of the way and now it is time to gather up the holy trinity, andouille sausage, crabs, shrimp, and everything but the kitchen sink as they say. In New Orleans, no one makes their gumbo the same. Tomatoes or no tomatoes? Okra or no okra? What is the difference between creole and cajun? What about, "how your mama and 'em make gumbo?" Well, here is how I was taught, so let's dive into day two.

New Orleans gumbo

Growing up, I remember taking what seemed like then a long trip to the Westwego Seafood Market with my parents to gather up a few pounds of shrimp, a dozen crabs, and a tub or two of crab and claw meat.

It is nothing fancy. Always crowded during this time of year. Stepping out onto the gravel, there are shacks lined up side by side one another. The owners have their tubs displayed out front filled with the day's catch. Fresh sweet gulf shrimp ranging from small to large. Redfish, trout, and snapper laid out as well.

There were mixed feelings about this trip because I knew a few of my favorite dishes were around the corner, but also a lot of peeling and deveining of shrimp was as well. Okay--so I am not talking a pound or two, but eight pounds and up! Everything on the holiday table contained seafood. Also, it was imperative to make that luscious stock with the shrimp heads and shells. No waste.

The Stock

Roux is important but the stock is just as important. Gumbo is about building flavors. It is not necessary but if you are able to get shrimp with the heads on, you will achieve a more flavourful and deep rich stock if just shells were used.

Aromatics are the standard, onion, garlic, celery, bay leaf, black peppercorns, lemon, and thyme.

The Fixin's

gumbo fixin's

This list can go on and on. I've seen hot dog weiners in gumbo to chicken wings and gizzards. Really, everything and anything can be used. I like to use: andouille sausage, diced ham, chicken gizzards, pulled meat from a rotisserie chicken and tasso when available.

The holy trinity is the base used in a lot of creole/cajun dishes. It is our mirepoix. Onions, green bell peppers, celery and garlic. That is it.

The Set Up

You are one day away from making your big pot of gumbo. The roux is already made and now it is just time to make the stock, cut up your meat, pull your chicken meat, and dice up the holy trinity.

Day two is out of the way and the last day is right around the corner to make your gumbo process a breeze! If you are feeling confident, all of these steps can be done in all one day.

If you need catching up, here is day 1! Roux

Stock and Fixin's

This is day 2. Let your stock simmer and gather all your meats.

Seafood Stock

  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 cups yellow or white onion cut in half
  • 2 stalks celery, roughly chopped
  • 1 carrot roughly chopped
  • 1 head garlic, split in half
  • 1 pound shrimp shells
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 lemon halved
  • 1 whole bay leaf

Fixin's

  • 1 1/2 pounds shrimp, peeled and devined
  • 3 blue crabs (cut into 4 pieces)
  • 1 pound andouille sausage, sliced
  • 1 stalk celery diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 1 onion diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 rotisserie chicken meat pulled
  • 1 cup ham, roughly chopped

Seafood Stock

  1. Heat oil in a large pot over moderate heat. Add onions, celery, carrots, leeks, and garlic. Cook for about 3 minutes. Add the shrimp shells, thyme, black peppercorns, lemon and bay leaf and cover with 4 quarts of water. Reduce heat and let simmer for at least 2 hours. Strain through a fine sieve into a container. Let stock cool , cover, and refrigerate.

Fixin's

  1. Gather all ingredients and individually place them in their separate containers.
  2. All meat can be stored together, except the chicken. Put that in last, we do not want it getting over cooked!

Thai Roasted Butternut Squash & Apple Soup

Thai Butternut Apple Soup One of my favorite food sites that religiously check everyday is Food52. I have been an avid clicker and reader since 2013 and just recently, entered a contest. Why it took so long? Not sure, but when you upload a recipe and you get some "love" clicks, it definitely feels good.

Thai Rosted Butternut Squash Apple Soup

The contest was for your "best savory winter squash" recipe. I had an idea off the bat of what I wanted  to make. Recently, I have been on a Thai food kick and have grown to love it! Now, I always enjoyed Thai food, but always thought it was all about that ultimate Thai noodle dish everyone knows and love, Pad Thai.

Thai Roasted Butternut Squash and Apple Soup

My favorite part of this dish is the "fixins." Roasted "puffed" pepitas and sauteed apples add a wonderful texture and crunch. While the coconut lime cream brings everything together, with its creamy, tangy, coconuty flavor. Fall is here, the squash is here to stay for a bit, and I hope this soup is something you will enjoy!

Thai Rosted Butternut Squash Apple Soup

Thai Roasted Butternut Squash & Apple Soup

  • 4 cups butternut squash (diced)
  • 2 cups red apples (chopped)
  • 1 cup sliced onion
  • Olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 5.6 ounces of canned coconut milk
  • 2 limes
  • 2 cups chicken broth or stock
  • 1 teaspoon freshly minced ginger
  • 1 teaspoon Sriracha
  • 2 tablespoons Thai red chili paste
  • 1 cup red apples (diced)
  • Pepitas for serving
  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.
  2. Toss butternut squash, the chopped apples, and the onions with a drizzle of olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and roast for 15-20 minutes until tender.
  3. Open up the can of coconut milk and scoop out the coconut fat and two tablespoons of the liquid into a small dish. Squeeze the juice of one lime and add a pinch of salt. Whisk and place the coconut-lime cream aside.
  4. Combine stock, roasted squash mixture, remaining coconut milk, ginger, Sriracha, Thai curry paste, and juice of one lime into a saucepan. Cook for 5 minutes. Taste for salt. Blend until smooth (in batches, if needed).
  5. Heat a frying pan over medium heat, add a drizzle of olive oil and add the diced apple. Sauté for 5-6minutes. Place aside.
  6. Toast pepitas in a dry pan until some brown color develops and they slightly puff up.
  7. Serve the soup topped with the coconut-lime cream, sautéed apples, and pepitas.